farming
slaves
weeding
plowing
seeds
irrigation
sickles
threshing
wheat
barley
millet
oats
rye
olive-trees
grapevines

Medieval Farming, Irrigation

Mostly this was done with irrigation canals and ditches.

In people's vegetable gardens, people often carried their water by hand from a stream or a well. 

Often people farm in a place where enough rain falls during the year (and at the right times) to water the plants just with rainfall.

Farmers don't have to worry about the plants getting enough rain. That's called "dry farming" because the farmers don't have to carry water to the plants.

 

There is no doubt that irrigation makes a major contribution to agricultural production, making a whole range of crops viable in an otherwise unreliable climate and helping insure against drought.

 

Farming Slaves, Weeding, Ploughing, Seeds, Irrigation, Sickles, Threshing, Wheat, Barley, Millet, Oats, Rye, Olive Trees, Grapevines


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