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Tudor Toilets

In the Tudor times people would be happy to have a wee just about anywhere, in the street, the corner of a room, there were even people who would hire you a bucket with a clock. poor people would wipe themselves with leaves, those better of used cloth.

At Hampton Court a 28 seat toilet house of "easement" was built, it emptied into the river Thames. While Henry VIII had a padded seat made with silk ribbons and gold studs, the servants shared the house of easement.

Tudor houses were designed like steps, people took care to shelter beneath the steps (called eves) so as to avoid the toilet waste being poured down from above on top of them.

In palaces and castles, which had a moat, the lords and ladies would retire to a toilet set into a cupboard in the wall called a garderobe. Here the waste would drop down a shaft into the water. In the country, the pit would be filled up when it was full - and a new one dug a little way away.

 


Toilets Romans Medieval Tudor Georgian Victorians Cesspit London's Drains Thomas Crapper Mullein


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